Speakers Biography

Biography and Abstract of Plenary Speakers

Professor Patrick Wheeler
Professor of Power Electronic Systems,
Head of Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering and Li Dak Sum Chair Professor in Electrical and Aerospace Engineering,
University of Nottingham, UK and China
Presentation Title: Transportation Electrification: what can we learn about power converter and drive train design from racing an Electric Superbike?
Biography

Prof Pat Wheeler received his BEng [Hons] degree in 1990 from the University of Bristol, UK.  He received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering for his work on Matrix Converters from the University of Bristol, UK in 1994.  In 1993 he moved to the University of Nottingham and worked as a research assistant in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.  In 1996 he became a Lecturer in the Power Electronics, Machines and Control Group at the University of Nottingham, UK.  Since January 2008 he has been a Full Professor in the same research group.  He is currently Head of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the University of Nottingham and the Li Dak Sum Chair Professor in Electrical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Nottingham, China.  He is a member of the IEEE PELs AdCom and was an IEEE PELs Distinguished Lecturer from 2013 to 2017.  He has published 500 academic publications in leading international conferences and journals.

Abstract

This presentation will consider the implications of the current trend towards the electrification of many modes of transport.  The talk will focus on the technological challenges for power electronics and motor drive engineers.  Examples used in the talk will include many of the technologies that have been developed for our race and award winning electric superbike, a great example of a high performance vehicle with a well-defined use case resulting in an optimised electrical system. Using this use case it is possible to begin to understand the requirements and technology advances needed for future electric vehicles including the challenges still to be addressed.

Professor Grahame Holmes
Innovation Professor, Smart Energy Systems, School of Engineering,
RMIT University, Australia
Presentation Title: Power Electronic Converters and the Emerging Smart Grid 
Biography

Coming Soon

Abstract

Coming Soon

Professor Udaya Madawala
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,
University of Auckland, New Zealand
Presentation Title:  Wireless Grid Integration of EVs for V2G applications: Challenges and Technologies
Biography

Udaya K. Madawala graduated with a B.Sc. (Electrical Engineering) (Hons) degree from The University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka in 1987, and received his PhD (Power Electronics) from The University of Auckland, New Zealand in 1993 as a Commonwealth Doctoral Scholar.  At the completion of his PhD, he was employed by Fisher & Paykel Ltd, New Zealand, as a Research and Development Engineer to develop new technologies for motor drives.  In 1997 he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The University of Auckland and, at present as a Full Professor, he focuses on a number of power electronics projects related to wireless grid integration of EVs for V2G applications and renewable energy.

Udaya is a Fellow of the IEEE and a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Power Electronic Society, and has over 30 years of both industry and research experience in the fields of power electronics and energy. He has served both the IEEE Power Electronics and Industrial Electronics Societies in numerous roles, relating to editorial, conference, technical committee and chapter activities. Currently, Udaya is an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, and a member of the Sustainable Energy Systems Technical Committee and the Oceania Liaison Chair of Membership Development Committee of the IEEE Power Electronics Society.  He was the General Chair of the 2nd IEEE Southern Power Electronics Conference (SPEC)- 2016, held in New Zealand, and is also the Chair of SPEC Steering Committee. Udaya holds a number of patents related to wireless power transfer and power converters, and is a consultant to industry.

Abstract

Electric vehicles (EVs) are gaining global acceptance as the means of future transport for sustainable living and as an alternative energy storage to stabilize the electricity network through the vehicle-to-grid (V2G) concept.  For V2G applications, EVs essentially require a bi-directional power interface with the electricity network (grid) to allow for both storing (charging) and retrieval (discharging) of energy.  This can be achieved by both wired and wireless means, but the latter, based primarily on Inductive Power Transfer (IPT) technology, is becoming more popular, being convenient, safe, and ideal for both stationary and dynamic (while on the move) charging of EVs.  This seminar presents trends and the latest advances in wireless grid integration of EVs, focusing particularly on the bi-directional wireless power transfer (BD-WPT) technology developed for V2G applications.  The latest advances in relation to both stationary and dynamic wireless charging are discussed, highlighting the challenges and solutions proposed to mitigate the problems associated with pad-misalignment, synchronization and pulse charging.

Professor Ron S.Y. Hui
Chair of Power Electronics, Faculty of Engineering
University of Hong Kong
Presentation Title: Past, Present and Future of Wireless Charging for Portable Electronics
Biography

Prof. Ron Hui obtained his Ph.D degree at Imperial College London in 1986. He has held academic positions at Nottingham University, Sydney University and CityU HK. Currently, he is a Chair Professor of Power Electronics at both of the University of Hong Kong and Imperial College London. At HKU, he holds the Philip Wong Wilson Wong Professorship of Electrical Engineering.

He has published over 260 refereed journal papers and has over 60 patents adopted by industry worldwide. His inventions have underpinned key dimensions of the world’s first wireless power standard Qi, launched in 2010 by the Wireless Power Consortium with over 650 company members including Apple, Samsung etc. He is the recipient of the 2015 IEEE William Newell Award, 2010 IEEE Rudolf Chope R&D Award and 2010 IET Crompton Medal. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, Australian Academy of Technology & Engineering, and the Royal Academy of Engineering, UK.

Abstract

This talk will start with a brief historical review of “near-field magnetic” wireless power transfer dating back from Nicolas Tesla’s work a century ago. It will highlight how magnetic resonance (a technique used by Tesla and many others up to the 1990s) is not a recent invention. It will also explain why WPT became feasible again since 1980s with some highlights of landmark examples. The final part of the talk will focus on the latest development of international WPT standards and future developments for wireless charging of “portable” electronics.

Professor Frede Blaabjerg

Department of Energy Technology,
Aalborg University, Denmark

Presentation Title: Power electronics — the key technology for renewable energy system integration 
Biography

Frede Blaabjerg (S’86–M’88–SM’97–F’03) was with ABB-Scandia, Randers, Denmark, from 1987 to 1988. From 1988 to 1992, he got the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at Aalborg University in 1995. He became an Assistant Professor in 1992, an Associate Professor in 1996, and a Full Professor of power electronics and drives in 1998. From 2017 he became a Villum Investigator. He is honoris causa at University Politehnica Timisoara (UPT), Romania and Tallinn Technical University (TTU) in Estonia.

His current research interests include power electronics and its applications such as in wind turbines, PV systems, reliability, harmonics and adjustable speed drives. He has published more than 500 journal papers in the fields of power electronics and its applications. He is the co-author of two monographs and editor of 7 books in power electronics and its applications.

He has received 26 IEEE Prize Paper Awards, the IEEE PELS Distinguished Service Award in 2009, the EPE-PEMC Council Award in 2010, the IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award 2014 and the Villum Kann Rasmussen Research Award 2014. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS from 2006 to 2012. He has been  Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Power Electronics Society from 2005 to 2007 and for the IEEE Industry Applications Society from 2010 to 2011 as well as 2017 to 2018. In 2018 he is President Elect of IEEE Power Electronics Society.

He is nominated in 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 by Thomson Reuters to be between the most 250 cited researchers in Engineering in the world.

Abstract

The energy paradigms in many countries (e.g., Germany and Denmark) have experienced a significant change from fossil-based resources to clean renewables (e.g., wind turbines and photovoltaics) in the past few decades. The scenario of highly penetrated renewables is going to be further enhanced– Denmark expects to be 100 percent fossil-free by 2050 – and maybe even before.

Consequently, it is required that the production, distribution and use of the energy should be as technologically efficient as possible and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be strengthened. In order to realize the transition smoothly and effectively, energy conversion systems, currently based on power electronics technology, will again play an essential role in this energy paradigm shift. Using highly efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application, together with advanced control solutions, can pave the way for renewable energies. In light of this, some of the most emerging renewable energies — , e.g., wind energy and photovoltaic, which by means of power electronics are changing character as a major part in the electricity generation —, are explored in this presentation. Issues like technology development, implementation, power converter technologies, control of the systems, and synchronization are addressed. Special focuses are paid on the future trends in power electronics for those systems like how to lower the cost of energy and to use emerging power devices and enable better reliability tool for system assessment.

Mr Alexander Gerfer
Chief Technology Officer,
Würth Elektronik eiSos Group
Presentation Title: Magnetics in the GaN/ SiC world
Biography

Alexander Gerfer is Managing Director and Chief Technology Officer of one of Europe’s largest manufacturers of electronic and electromechanical components with around 7,000 employees. The company is based in Waldenburg, Munich and Berlin and Barcelona, and also with R&D locations in Silicon Valley, Dallas and Shenzhen.

The graduate electrical engineer learned his business from scratch as a radio and television technician. He completed his studies at the Rheinische Fachhochschule Köln. He is also the author of many specialist contributions and publications in the field of consumer electronics, author of the book “trilogy of inductors” and co-author of various other textbooks and holds numerous patents.

In the company Würth Elektronik eiSos he is a man of the first hour, founded the product development as well as the quality management. His aspiration is to communicate electronic content to users of electronic components in an understandable way and without unnecessary ballast. Numerous product replacements and innovations are based on his constant search for more efficient components.

Today the Rhinelander is responsible for the strategy of Würth Elektronik eiSos and thus for the areas of product management, quality management, supply chain management, research and development. Alexander Gerfer also travels internationally as a sought-after key speaker and as a promoter of innovative startups.

Abstract

Storage chokes and transformers are key components for high-efficiency, clocked voltage transformers. However, young engineers often face contradictions and uncertainties in this area. These results from different factors:

Lack of basics: Without solid basic knowledge myths persists.
Lack of standards or imprecise information from the manufacturer cause further confusion.
But what are the parameters that need to be specified?

What about inductors and their materials in the new transistor technology GaN / SiC?
Are the materials really so bad? How can you optimize the design?

Alexander Gerfer addresses the question in his keynote speech and presents his point of view and recommendation.

 

Biography and Abstract of Tutorial Speakers

Professor Frede Blaabjerg Department of Energy Technology,
Aalborg University, Denmark
Presentation Title: An Introduction to Power Electronics Reliability
Biography

Frede Blaabjerg (S’86–M’88–SM’97–F’03) was with ABB-Scandia, Randers, Denmark, from 1987 to 1988. From 1988 to 1992, he got the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at Aalborg University in 1995. He became an Assistant Professor in 1992, an Associate Professor in 1996, and a Full Professor of power electronics and drives in 1998. From 2017 he became a Villum Investigator. He is honoris causa at University Politehnica Timisoara (UPT), Romania and Tallinn Technical University (TTU) in Estonia.

His current research interests include power electronics and its applications such as in wind turbines, PV systems, reliability, harmonics and adjustable speed drives. He has published more than 500 journal papers in the fields of power electronics and its applications. He is the co-author of two monographs and editor of 7 books in power electronics and its applications.

He has received 26 IEEE Prize Paper Awards, the IEEE PELS Distinguished Service Award in 2009, the EPE-PEMC Council Award in 2010, the IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award 2014 and the Villum Kann Rasmussen Research Award 2014. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS from 2006 to 2012. He has been Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Power Electronics Society from 2005 to 2007 and for the IEEE Industry Applications Society from 2010 to 2011 as well as 2017 to 2018. In 2018 he is President Elect of IEEE Power Electronics Society.

He is nominated in 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 by Thomson Reuters to be between the most 250 cited researchers in Engineering in the world.

Associate Professor Huai Wang
Center of Reliable Power Electronics (CORPE), Aalborg University, Denmark
Presentation Title: An Introduction to Power Electronics Reliability
Biography

Huai Wang is currently an Associate Professor with the Center of Reliable Power Electronics (CORPE), Aalborg University, Denmark. His research addresses the fundamental challenges in modelling and validation of the failure mechanisms of active and passive power electronic components, and application issues in system-level predictability, circuit architecture, and robustness design. Prof. Wang has contributed the first few concept papers in the area of power electronics reliability, filed several patents in advanced passive component concepts, and co-edited a book. He received his PhD degree from the City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China, and B.E. degree in electrical engineering, from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. He was a Visiting Scientist with the ETH Zurich, Switzerland, from Aug. to Sep. 2014 and with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA, from Sep. to Nov. 2013. He was with the ABB Corporate Research Center, Switzerland, in 2009. Prof. Wang received the IEEE PELS Richard M. Bass Outstanding Young Power Electronics Engineer Award, in 2016. He is currently the Award Chair of the Technical Committee of the High Performance and Emerging Technologies, IEEE Power Electronics Society, and the Chair of IEEE PELS/IAS/IE Chapter in Denmark. He serves as an Associate Editor of IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics, and IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, and IET Power Electronics.

Abstract

Coming Soon

Professor Ralph Kennel
Chair of Electrical Drive Systems and Power Electronics
Technische Universität München, Germany
Presentation Title: Model Predictive Control on electrical drives and power converters (including multi-level converters)
Biography

Ralph M. Kennel was born in 1955 at Kaiserslautern (Germany). In 1979 he got his diploma degree and in 1984 his Dr.-Ing. (Ph.D.) degree from the University of Kaiserslautern.

From 1983 to 1999 he worked on several positions with Robert BOSCH GmbH (Germany). Until 1997 he was responsible for the development of servo drives. Dr. Kennel was one of the main supporters of VECON and SERCOS interface, two multi-company development projects for a microcontroller and a digital interface especially dedicated to servo drives. Furthermore he took actively part in the definition and release of new standards with respect to CE marking for servo drives.

Between 1997 and 1999 Dr. Kennel was responsible for “Advanced and Product Development of Fractional Horsepower Motors” in automotive applications. His main activity was preparing the introduction of brushless drive concepts to the automotive market.

From 1994 to 1999 Dr. Kennel was appointed Visiting Professor at the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (England, UK). From 1999 – 2008 he was Professor for Electrical Machines and Drives at Wuppertal University (Germany). Since 2008 he is Professor for Electrical Drive systems and Power Electronics at Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). His main interests today are: Sensorless control of AC drives, predictive control of power electronics and Hardware-in-the-Loop systems.

Dr. Kennel is a Senior Member of IEEE, a Fellow of IET (former IEE) and a Chartered Engineer in the UK. Within IEEE he is Treasurer of the Germany Section as well as Distinguished Lecturer of the Power Electronics Society (IEEE-PELS).

Dr. Kennel has received in 2013 the Harry Owen Distinguished Service Award from IEEE-PELS as well as the EPE Association Distinguished Service Award in 2015.

Dr. Kennel was appointed “Extraordinary Professor” by the University of Stellenbosch (South Africa) from 2016 to 2019 and as “Visiting Professor” at the Haixi Institute by the Chinese Academy of Sciences from 2016 to 2021. There he was appointed as “Jiaxi Lu Overseas Guest Professor” in 2017.

Abstract

So far the control of electrical power using power converters has been based on the principle of mean value, using pulse width modulation with (sometimes parallelized) linear controllers in a cascaded structure. Recent research works have demonstrated that it is possible to use Predictive Control to control electrical energy with the use of power converters, without using modulators and linear controllers. This is a new approach that will have a strong impact on control in power electronics in coming decades. The main advantages are: – Concepts are very intuitive and easy to understand. – Easy inclusion of non-linearities in the model.

Professor Jin Wang
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,
The Ohio State University, USA
Presentation Title: High Power Applications of Wide Bandgap Power Devices
Biography

Jin Wang received a B.S. degree from Xi’an Jiaotong University, in 1998, an M.S. degree from Wuhan University, in 2001, and a Ph.D. from Michigan State University, East Lansing, in 2005, all in electrical engineering.

From Sept. 2005 to Aug. 2007, he worked at the Ford Motor Company as a Core Power Electronics Engineer. He joined the Ohio State University in 2007 as an Assistant Professor and was promoted to Associate professor in 2013 and full professor in 2017. His research interests include wide bandgap power devices and their applications, high-voltage and high-power converter/inverters, integration of renewable energy sources, and electrification of transportation. Dr. Wang has over 150 peer-reviewed journal and conference publications and 6 patents.

Dr. Wang received the IEEE Power Electronics Society Richard M. Bass Young Engineer Award in 2011, the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award in 2011, and the IEEE Will Portnoy Prize Paper Award in 2018. At The Ohio State University, Dr. Wang received the Ralph L. Boyer Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Innovation in 2012, the Lumley Research Award in 2013 and the Harrison Faculty Award for Excellence in Engineering Education in 2017. Dr. Wang served as the General Chair and the Steering Committee Chair for the IEEE Future Energy Challenge in 2016 and 2017, respectively. Dr. Wang had been an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications from 2008 to 2014. Currently, Dr. Wang serves as the Tutorial Co-chair for IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference 2019, an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics and the IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics (J-ESTPE). Dr. Wang initiated and served as the General Chair for the 1st IEEE Workshop on Wide Bandgap Power Devices and Applications in 2013.

Abstract

The tutorial will focus on high power applications of Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices.  It will start with a brief introduction of current development status of GaN and SiC devices.  Then, common issues that are faced by both GaN and low voltage (<3.3 kV) SiC devices including gate drive designs, high dv/dt caused reflective waves, electromagnetic interference, etc, will be discussed in detail.  A 10 kW GaN based three-phase inverter and a 1.7 kV SiC based sub-module for a 1 MVA SiC modular multilevel converter (MMC) will be used as case study examples.  Then for GaN specific issues, the tutorial will focus on short circuit capability of 600 V and above rated GaN devices and related detection and protection methods.  For SiC specific issues, the tutorial will discuss challenges for the implementations of medium voltage (3.3 kV to 15 kV) SiC devices.  Insulation requirements, auxiliary power supply designs, fast short circuit protection, and partial discharge related design considerations will be discussed in detail.  Multiple examples on 3.3 kV, 4.5 kV and 10 kV based circuit building blocks will be included as case study examples.

Mr Min Luo
Application Engineer, Plexim
Presentation Topic: Technologies for simulation of multi-level converters
Biography

Min Luo received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 2009 and M.S. degree in electrical power engineering from RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, in 2012. In 2014 he joined Power Electronics Laboratory of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland as external doctoral research assistant, and received the PhD degree in 2018. Meanwhile he has been with Plexim as application engineer since 2012, working on the simulation tools for power electronic systems.

His current research interest include dynamic modelling of magnetic components and real-time HIL simulation of power converters.

Abstract

In high power power converter applications, complex topologies like NPC (neutral point clamped multi level converter) or MMC (modular multi-level converter) are commonly used nowadays, besides that parallel and series connection of sub-systems also become popular solution. System level simulation is usually carried out for component selection, control design and performance evaluation as reference for hardware configuration. However the complexity of the MV converter system will add up to the size of the model, and significantly slow down the simulation speed or in some circumstances bring difficulties for convergence. In order to simulate the large converter model efficiently, understanding of the system model in a sufficient depth is required, based on which special technologies can be applied to speed up the calculation and meanwhile guarantee the accuracy. This presentation will provide the audience an insight for system-level modeling concept for power electronics, and different special technologies for large model simulation of MV application will be introduced in details with typical examples.